Why giving a **** is important.....

A number of things have happened in the last week, which make me glad I am curious, enjoy learning, improving things, and don’t have issues with standing up for myself. This may sound like a disparate collection of things, but there is a common thread.

Trying to get anything “done” on Christmas eve (in the UK) is going to en-tale a degree of patience. But getting some clips for a car mud flap should be easy.  They should be generic, and anyone should be able to sell them to me.  This assumption was not correct.

**I have written before about the importance of fixing broken windows.  This translates to taking an interest.**

Turning up at Priests Ford, five minutes later I had fallen into the “British disease” of apathy, dis-interest, not listening to constructive criticism. A perfect example of “a family business” who does not listen to customer feedback (and most importantly you don’t feed back to the Ford motor company).

**A lack of interest in improving “anything” is a huge issue. Even if you hate whatever (it is) you do, take the time to improve “the real-estate”. Don't say “it's got nothing to do with me”.  **

Getting people interested in “something” is half-the-battle.  There is nothing worse than trying to __transfer passion and enthusiasm about a subject to a dis-interested audience or individual.  

You have to dig-deep, and create the momentum yourself.  It’s not easy (and that is an understatement).

For me, the two single things which have inspired _**me** most in 2013_ are starting to learn about silver-smithing / jewellery making, and [http://redmonk.com/thingmonk/](http://redmonk.com/thingmonk/) Both are about people taking an interest in their environment, and improving things. Crafting, creating, silver, technology, printing, barista .... all examples of people doing relevant _**stuff.**_** ** **Thingmonk was **(for me)** all about making relevant, tangible improvements, listening to the community, and if things go wrong "fess up" (give a ****).  ** **I will be doing this (across the board) in 2014.**

(happy new year)

Author | Miles Davenport

Career programmer, who designs, assembles, fixes, and supports customers, software and systems.